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The Recording Studio Is More Dangerous Than The Block: A Few Tips To Survive Your Next Recording Session

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So the goal is to get up out the hood by any means necessary. Selling dope is an option, but this rap s*** can get ya moms out the hood and help the homies come up too. But getting a major record deal, and living in a home way up in the hills away from the ills of the ghetto does not guarantee safety from the street life. Just chilling in the studio, or taking a stroll to the studio requires one to be with the s***s. Here’s a few tips to survive your next recording session at the studio.

Don’t Let Any Opps Run Off With Your Gun In The Studio

 Up and coming rapper Bankroll Fresh lost his life in the studio during an alleged confrontation with a rival rapper No Plug at a recording studio in Atlanta. During the confrontation, Plug got a hold of Bankroll’s gun and ran off with it. Bankroll pursued his rival outside where he was shot at over 50 times.

Show Up To A Scheduled Studio Session Sober And On Time, Make Sure The Crew Makes It In Safely

 On November 30, 1994, in the lobby of the infamous Quad Studios, we should all be familiar with this story; Tupac was shot five times while high and late for a recording session. There are several conspiracies surrounding this incident, but the most widely circulated tale is that the Bad Boy crew played a role in the murder attempt. Pac and artists from the Bad Boy camp were acquaintances prior to the shooting, but Pac Commenced an all out war on the east coast entourage after he recovered from his injuries. Part of Pac’s reasoning for his attack on Bad Boy was that he believed they could have either helped him avoid the shooting or helped him find the perpetrators.

Keep The Ratchet With You At All Times

The legendary Jam Master Jay was murdered in a Jamaica, Queens recording Studio in 2002. He was accompanied by another gentleman when a shooter entered the room where they were recording and opened fire. The murder is still unsolved, but it’s believed that Jay disregarded the demand of a street kingpin to blacklist rapper 50 Cent. Exercise your second amendment rights and take the burner with you into the studio. If weapons are prohibited then know how to work with them hands, or have a crew that can throw down for you.

If Greeted By Another Artist, Fan, Or Friend while Leaving Or Entering The Studio, Plow Them Down And Keep It Moving

 It’s not always gunplay that goes down at the studio. Sometimes surviving a studio session just requires old school brawling skills, but also remember you may be able to avoid confrontation altogether by avoiding chitchat with anyone outside of the crew. Chris Brown learned the hard way when he stopped to talk to Frank Ocean after a studio session in 2013. Frank reportedly told Chris that the studio was his, and had one of his goons proceed to attack Chris. Luckily Chris had a street brawling entourage with him that came to his aid.

Don’t Park To Far Away From The Studio; Be Ready To hop In The Bugatti And Peel Off

17-Year-old rapper L.A. Capone was leaving a Chicago recording studio in 2013 to get to his ride that was some ways away from the studio. During his walk he was shot four times after a then unknown person approached him and opened fire; Capone died two hours later from the gun shot wounds. The shooter and those involved were later identified, but the shooting only fueled the ongoing gang war in the city.

Don’t Leave A Studio Session Alone Or You Could Possibly Get Jumped

Before 50 Cent became legendary after surviving 9 gunshot wounds, he got caught lackin’ again while leaving a New York recording studio. It was reported that members from Murder Inc. attacked Fiddy as he left the studio. During the brawl, the South park Kenny of rap was stabbed, but sustained minor injuries. Follow this tip, and all of the previous ones to avoid having your next concert in the ICU or in the cemetery.

 

 

 

 

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Will Eady
Born and raised in the birthplace of Funk, and arguably the birthplace of Rock n’ Roll, music is in my veins. If names like Bootsy Collins, and the Ohio Players ring a bell, then you know where I come from. As a musician and poet myself, I have an appreciation for art that hasn’t been inundated by the agendas of major labels and networks. Recently I’ve been sharing music and connecting with artists via social media. Follow me on Instagram @mainstream_music_isgarbage.